Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters

America’s waterways provide us with drinking water, places to fish and swim, and critical habitat for wildlife – when they are clean and protected.

The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972 was a turning point in America’s efforts to protect and restore its rivers, lakes and coastal waters. Though the Clean Water Act has made some progress bringing our waters back to health, a closer look at compliance with and enforcement of the law reveals an overly lenient system that too often allows pollution without accountability.

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

To protect and restore our waters, state and federal officials must tighten enforcement of the Clean Water Act. 

News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Polluters Dumping into New Mexico’s Waterways

Industrial facilities dumped excessive pollution into New Mexico’s waterways 48 times over 21 months, according to a new report by Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center. The facilities rarely faced penalties for this pollution.

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters 2018

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

Friday morning at 5 a.m. The sky is dark, but the roads are clear and I’m just a few miles away from my AirBnb in Murfreesboro, Tennessee — valuables, pup and nourishment in tow. After 18 hours of driving, I’m exhausted but grateful to be out of harm’s way.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Get the Lead Out

Over the past two years, the tragedy of Flint, Michigan has stunned the nation. We watched the drinking water of an entire city become contaminated with lead. And now we know this toxic threat extends well beyond Flint to communities across the country. In fact, test results now show that lead is even contaminating drinking water in schools and pre-schools — flowing from thousands of fountains and faucets where our kids drink water every day.

News Release | Environment New Mexico

Environment New Mexico Moving Ahead to Get Local Governments to Go Big on Solar

On the heels of the Albuquerque City Council adopting a bold goal to make the City a leader in solar energy, Environment New Mexico announced a push to get cities and local governments across the state and country to make sizable commitments to capturing the power of the sun.  The “Shining Cities” campaign will engage and mobilize thousands of members, volunteers and the growing ranks of stakeholders who recognize the tremendous environmental and economic benefits to convince local governments to expand their use of pollution-free solar power.

Result

We helped win the single biggest action our country has ever taken on climate

Under the newly announced Clean Power Plan, gas and coal power plants will pollute 32 percent less and clean energy sources such as wind and solar will meet much more of the nation’s electricity needs. Environment America is proud of the role we’ve played to galvanize public support for this historic plan. With continued commitment from President Obama and state leaders, and strong backing from the American people, this will mark a giant shift toward the 100 percent clean energy reality that the climate crisis demands and future generations deserve.

River otter, today’s your special day

By | Russell Bassett
Clean Water Digital Campaigner

It’s International River Otter Awareness Day! Here are five reasons we appreciate these amazing creatures.

Report | Environment America

America’s Next Top Polluter

Tyson Foods, Inc. is “one of the world’s largest producers of meat and poultry.” The company’s pollution footprint includes manure from its contract growers’ factory farm operations, fertilizer runoff from grain grown to feed the livestock it brings to market as meat, and waste from its processing plants.

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